Kitchen show – Cocina Con Carmen http://cocinaconcarmen.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:50:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-24T184718.286.png Kitchen show – Cocina Con Carmen http://cocinaconcarmen.com/ 32 32 President Biden’s Remarks at a Friendship Action Dinner with Military Members and Military Families | Cherry Point, North Carolina https://cocinaconcarmen.com/president-bidens-remarks-at-a-friendship-action-dinner-with-military-members-and-military-families-cherry-point-north-carolina/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 00:47:57 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/president-bidens-remarks-at-a-friendship-action-dinner-with-military-members-and-military-families-cherry-point-north-carolina/ Marine Corps Air StationCherry Point, North Carolina THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much. (Applause.) I imagine it must be boring, boring, boring for these kids to get up here. (Laughs.) You have the right to do whatever you want, including stealing a pumpkin if you want. Anything you want to do. It’s an honor for […]]]>

Marine Corps Air Station
Cherry Point, North Carolina

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much. (Applause.)

I imagine it must be boring, boring, boring for these kids to get up here. (Laughs.) You have the right to do whatever you want, including stealing a pumpkin if you want. Anything you want to do.

It’s an honor for Jill and I to be here. You know, we–we got–the reason we come is the chef’s not bad. You know, we’ve had – we’ve had a lot of meals with him in the past. Thanks. Thanks for all you’ve done.

You know, being here with the – with the Marines and sailors of the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force is a great honor. You know, I had the opportunity to see you all in the mountains of – and I say this sincerely – the mountains of Bosnia. I saw you in Iraq. I saw you in Afghanistan. And you are amazing.

The American people have no idea of ​​the sacrifices you are making. One percent – one percent of you is 99 percent of the public. You are all volunteers. You all introduce yourself. And you’re always there for — and we have a — I used to get in trouble for saying, when I was a senator, America has a lot of responsibilities but only one sacred responsibility. And I say that sincerely from the bottom of my heart. That’s it – to equip those we send into danger and take care of them and their families when they return home.

Because as I said, you represent 1% of the population. You defend the rest of us. You’re the–you’re the backbone, the nerve, the backbone of the country. And you really are.

And so, I just want to come – we wanted to come and tell you how much we appreciate everything you’ve done.

And you know, John Milton, the famous poet, said: They also stand — they also serve those who just stand and wait. Your mothers, your fathers, your husbands, your wives – often they cannot be with you – like now, for many of you. And they also serve.

I remember when our son Beau was in Kosovo for six months as an American lawyer and then he volunteered to go to Iraq for a year.

And every morning I got up before — before — Jill, my wife, is a teacher. She would get – she gets up earlier than me. She would be out of–out of the house at seven o’clock. And I walked into the kitchen, and she was with her coffee, standing over–standing over the sink, saying a prayer. Just say a prayer every day.

Because your parents, when you’re deployed, they don’t know or your spouses don’t know for sure. Every day they worry about you. Every moment. And so, we owe them too. We owe them a great debt of gratitude.

And the other thing is, you know, one of the things that people don’t understand and they – until they meet you is that you’re literally, not figuratively, the greatest fighting force, the best fighting force in the history of the world. This is not hyperbole. In the history of the world. This is not a joke. And you really are an incredible group of women and men.

And, again, I also want to thank the spouses, because they’ve borne so much of your — because of your service. And a lot of these empty tables — I don’t know how many birthdays you’ve had, there’s been an empty chair in your house, with your parents staring at that chair, wondering if you’re okay, especially if you’re deployed.

In short, thank you, thank you, thank you for all that you have done.

By the way, I serve mashed potatoes, so come to my place. I’m the – joking aside, thank you for everything you’ve done.

And, you know, there’s – there’s a lot – a lot of the rest of – I – I travel the world a lot, because – before that as vice-president, before that as chairman of the foreign relations. And nobody–nobody in the world misunderstands your competence. Nobody in the world misunderstands that you are the best fighting force in the world. This is not a joke. It is the truth of God.

So, thank you, thank you, thank you. And I hope you have a great Thanksgiving and a Merry Christmas. God bless you all. Thanks.

Now, I’m not supposed to bless anybody. I’m supposed to call the–the chaplain here. Where is the chaplain? Is he around?

There you are, chaplain. OK. I was going to say your prayer for you, but I’m going to forsake that.

Okay, you know, I – I – they got lucky. I decided not to do what you are doing. (Laughs.) So there you go. It’s all up to you.

CHAPLAIN MYHAND: Thank you, sir.

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much.

6:19 p.m. EST

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Where to order takeout Thanksgiving dinner 2022 – NBC Connecticut https://cocinaconcarmen.com/where-to-order-takeout-thanksgiving-dinner-2022-nbc-connecticut/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 21:16:33 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/where-to-order-takeout-thanksgiving-dinner-2022-nbc-connecticut/ Cooking on Thanksgiving can be a daunting task for anyone, but if you’re celebrating with a small crowd or just want to take the “stress out” of desserts, then ordering Thanksgiving dinner to go might be the best option. According to a 2021 survey by LendingTree, Americans Hosting Thanksgiving Dinner Will Spend $391.60 to feed […]]]>

Cooking on Thanksgiving can be a daunting task for anyone, but if you’re celebrating with a small crowd or just want to take the “stress out” of desserts, then ordering Thanksgiving dinner to go might be the best option.

According to a 2021 survey by LendingTree, Americans Hosting Thanksgiving Dinner Will Spend $391.60 to feed the people around the table.

Not sure where to start? Here are 23 places to go for Thanksgiving dinner.

23 places to dine this Thanksgiving

whole foods

Looking to impress your family and friends with a lot less hassle? whole foods offers a full Thanksgiving menu, whether you serve just the family or the whole block. Classics like turkey and mashed potatoes are on the menu alongside specialties like mac and cheese and Brussels sprouts. Most dishes are precooked and simply require preheating before serving.

Popeyes

A famous favorite is back this year – Popeyes‘ Cajun turkey. Starting October 18, customers can order their birds delivered to their doorstep. A representative of the brand described its famous turkeys to TODAY: “Marinated with our signature blend of Louisiana-style seasonings, the Cajun-style turkey is slowly roasted then fried to ensure a crispy, flavorful coating.”

Bob Evans

A representative for Bob Evans Restaurants confirmed TODAY that the American chain will once again offer its famous Farmhouse Feast options – for all group sizes – this holiday season. Thanksgiving celebration platters, which include turkey, dressing, cranberry relish, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, buttered corn and a bun, will also be available.

carmine

Carmine’s is offering a special family-style Thanksgiving menu available to take out this year at all of its locations nationwide. According to a rep, the special includes an 18-pound roast turkey with sausage and sage stuffing, along with classic sides like Brussels sprouts, sautéed green beans and sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows and maple syrup. maple. The meal serves six to eight people for $349 for New York locations and $295 for DC, Las Vegas and Atlantic City.

Publix

Just in time for the holiday season, Publix Deli will be offering a variety of fully cooked dinner options. A representative for the grocer told TODAY that dinners will include turkey or ham options, with side dishes like old-fashioned cornbread dressing, sweet potato casserole and risotto with harvest vegetables. Prices are not yet available.

The Honey Baked Ham Co.

Forget the prep work altogether with home cooking Honey Baked Ham Co Thanksgiving Meal. Sure, there’s juicy ham available, but the franchise also offers turkeys — Cajun, roasted, or smoked — for $73.99. Combo packs of sides, like sweet potato soufflé, stuffing, green beans, and gravy, are also available, because what’s Thanksgiving without the sides?

belly of gold

Ordering never looked so good. belly of gold is offering “Pies, Thighs & All The Thanksgiving Sides” this year for its holiday broadcast. From whole smoked turkeys to festive cakes from Duff Goldman himself, there’s no shortage of festive dishes for every palate.

by Marie Callender

Prepare to feast with Marie Callender’s homemade Thanksgiving dinners. Available to serve groups of four to eight, each dinner includes“your choice of turkey breast, spiralized glazed ham, or whole turkey with mashed potatoes and gravy, vegetables, yams, stuffing, cranberry sauce, and cornbread with honey spread.”
Availability is based on location.

Boston Market

Let Boston Market put “a little joy on your table” this year with warmth and serving Thanksgiving-style meals offered buffet style or as individual dishes. Orders can be placed online for Premium Meals, which include three sides, for $15.49 per person or Deluxe Meals, which have two sides for $13.99 per person. Main courses include turkey, ham, or chicken options, and both packages require a minimum order of 10 people. A Boston Market spokesperson shared that its holiday menus are available from October 24, 2022 through January 3, 2023.

Buca di Beppo

The turkey, stuffing and all the toppings plus the dessert are what make the Thanksgiving party offered by Buca di Beppo so special. 2022 availability has yet to be revealed, but thanks to the popularity of pre-prepared meals in 2021, the company plans to unveil pre-prepared meals this year as well.

Williams Sonoma

Leave the guesswork to the pros with a full Thanksgiving menu (sold a la carte) from Williams-Sonoma. A selection of whole turkeys, as well as turkey breasts, are available alongside side dishes like lobster mac and cheese ($119.95), stuffed potatoes ($59.95) and beef Wellington ($99.95 $). And don’t forget the pecan pie!

Cheer! Italian food

No need to prepare anything: Bravo! Italian Kitchen has it all. Pre-order your “Thanksgiving Party to Go” starting at $105 for a small group, or $560 for a feast of up to 20 people. Meals include turkey, gravy, potatoes, green beans and more and can be picked up cold for easy reheating at mealtime.

Crackling

Let Sizzler do the cooking this year with his “heat and eat” meals, which include fresh roast turkey with stuffing, green beans, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes with garlic garnish, maple and cranberry sauce. Find a location near you — and don’t forget a slice of pie!

Cracker Barrel

Cracker Barrel wants to help you make thanksgiving special, not stressful, which is why it offers ready-to-serve “Heat-n-Serve” Thanksgiving meals with two hours of prep time. Meals are available for up to 10 people and include turkey and dressing with gravy, cranberry relish, turkey gravy, country green beans, macaroni and cheese, sweet potato casserole and small breads. Prices start at $14 per person.

Omaha Steaks

Customize anything online and Thanksgiving will appear on your doorstep thanks to Omaha Steaks. A custom Thanksgiving meal for eightwhich includes a choice of turkey breast or ham, three sides and two desserts starting at $274.40.

Ponderosa Steakhouse

Get a plate to go this year at Ponderosa Steakhouse Locations. Take-out Thanksgiving platters start at $12 each for turkey. or $14 for the ham and includes mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, vegetables and a roll.

Bonanza Steakhouse

Just like sister brand Ponderosa, a representative of Bonanza Steakhouse locations said TODAY the chain will offer Thanksgiving platters starting at $12 for turkey or $14 for ham. Sides include mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, vegetables and a roll.

Gurgling

Gurgling makes on-the-go Thanksgiving dinner even easier. The meal delivery service offers a full line of holiday meals starting at $179.99 for a menu that serves up to six people. Dishes include roasted turkey breast, gravy, mashed potatoes, cornbread stuffing, cranberry compote, candied yams, green beans, and chili mac and cheese .

Costco

The big box retailer is putting turkeys on the tables this season. The “complete meal in a box” includes antibiotic-free turkey breast, mashed potatoes, old-fashioned stuffing, Brussels sprout casserole and more. Of course, two pies for dessert are included. The meal, which serves eight to 10 people, costs $269.99.

Harry and David

A gourmet turkey feast is just a click away thanks to Harry & David’s Thanksgiving meal ready to reheat, which includes a 10-pound turkey, apple sausage stuffing, black truffle and almond green beans, brown sugar sweet potatoes, pumpkin cheesecake, classic turkey gravy and a sliced ​​cranberry chutney for $249.99. Already fixed on the main course? Side dishes like Spinach with Parmesan Cream and Acorn Squash with Maple Glaze start at $39.99.

home cook

Have dinner delivered right to your door with Chef’s Holiday Menu. A turkey breast roast for six ($49.50) can come with sides like mashed potatoes loaded with bacon, cheddar and scallions or a sweet potato casserole. Don’t forget the Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Skillet for dessert!

Cooked by Melissa

Need a dessert? Cooked by Melissa got you covered – with cupcakes. If pie burnt is a concern this season, take the guesswork out and order a dozen (or more) cupcakes in flavors like caramel apple pie or pumpkin pie. For every purchase of “Give Thanks” cupcakes, the brand will donate $1 to City Harvest to support New Yorkers in need.

Trader Joe’s

Thanksgiving? From a grocery store? Innovative. But hear us out on this turkey and stuffing crust from Trader Joe’s. According to the website, “A savory turkey fillet and sweet cornbread stuffing are hand-rolled in buttery flaky puff pastry. A sprinkle of Herbes de Provence on top of the pastry adds an elegant touch.” Serve it with a scoop of mashed potatoes or your favorite green side for an almost instant Thanksgiving meal.

This story first appeared on TODAY.com. More from today:

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Taube Museum Art Exhibition Opens Today | News, Sports, Jobs https://cocinaconcarmen.com/taube-museum-art-exhibition-opens-today-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 06:04:40 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/taube-museum-art-exhibition-opens-today-news-sports-jobs/ Andrea Johnson/DND Ryan Stander, an associate professor of art at Minot State University, creates wooden charcuterie boards in the garage of his home in his spare time. His art is exhibited during the Arts Festival at the Musée de Taube until December 23rd. Ryan Stander, associate professor of art at Minot […]]]>

Andrea Johnson/DND Ryan Stander, an associate professor of art at Minot State University, creates wooden charcuterie boards in the garage of his home in his spare time. His art is exhibited during the Arts Festival at the Musée de Taube until December 23rd.

Ryan Stander, associate professor of art at Minot State University, creates beautiful wooden charcuterie boards using laminated wood.

“It’s something I can do at home while I watch my boys,” said Stander, whose art will be on display at the Taube Museum of Art in downtown Minot until Dec. 23. An opening reception will be held today from 5 to 7 p.m. Visitors will have the chance to meet Stander and the other 25 local artists, view their art, all of which is for sale, and enjoy food and drink.

Executive Director Rachel Alfaro said the Arts Festival show helps support local artists and will give visitors holiday shopping ideas.

Stander creates his artwork in his garage during the summer months. The family tests the charcuterie boards in the kitchen and he learns what works best for cutting. They keep a few of their favorites on hand, but Stander is selling his other creations. One design features constellations that represent his friend’s birth month and a birthday month. It also incorporates wooden plugs into the charcuterie boards as a design element. The caps started out as a way to fix problems with cards, but are now part of his signature design.

Stander also has other artwork on display at the show.

Alfaro and volunteers were preparing the art exhibit on Wednesday. Artwork includes a variety, like creative stocking stuffers by Marilyn Niewoehner and paintings by Virginia Conn.

Alfaro said the Taube Museum of Art will also host the Holiday Twilight Tour of Homes from 3-7 p.m. on Dec. 3, returning for the first time this year after a two-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 19. People will have the opportunity to visit seven beautifully decorated holiday homes, take a walk with cookies, and purchase unique handmade items as part of the museum’s Arts Festival. Tickets for the event are $16, available online, at Taube, Artmain, the Northwest Arts Center and at all Minot Marketplace Foods stores.



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USF Dining offers international educational experiences https://cocinaconcarmen.com/usf-dining-offers-international-educational-experiences/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 20:39:49 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/usf-dining-offers-international-educational-experiences/ The University of South Florida is a cultural melting pot, with a student body representing more than 146 countries. USF Restoration Services celebrates the diversity of the USF community through its Tastes Around the World program, which introduces diners on campuses in Tampa and St. Petersburg to a new ingredient or cooking style each week. […]]]>

The University of South Florida is a cultural melting pot, with a student body representing more than 146 countries. USF Restoration Services celebrates the diversity of the USF community through its Tastes Around the World program, which introduces diners on campuses in Tampa and St. Petersburg to a new ingredient or cooking style each week. For some it’s a taste of home, for others it’s an educational opportunity to try something new.

Food has been bringing people together since the days of the caveman,” said David DiSalvo, district manager for USF Dining Services. “When we come to share experiences, expand our palate, or broaden our perspective through food, it creates authentic and meaningful connections between people.”

Research conducted by Aramarkthe university’s dining partner, shows that university communities have a strong desire for more global flavors that are often underrepresented in dining halls, with 67% of Gen Zers preferring authentic cultural cuisine.

When the idea for Tastes Around the World was first pitched at USF, campus diners from different countries were asked to give their take on the recipes. Thanks to this feedback, the chefs were able to tweak the food to be more authentic and even shared the new recipes with Aramark’s global college network. The program has since been a success, and according to Jessica Cicalese, director of marketing for USF Dining Services, when the Peri-Peri Chicken was served in the spring, a college student reached out and said the meal felt like… ‘to be at the house. in Portugal. “It’s very meaningful to hear these kinds of comments,” Cicalese said.

Tastes Around the World dishes can be found at Juniper Dining and The Hub on the Tampa campus and The Nest on the St. Petersburg campus. Students, faculty, and staff can use USF Meal Swipes, USF Dining Dollars, cash, or credit/debit cards to enjoy all-you-can-eat dining. The weekly international features range from a special ingredient such as gochujang, a popular red chili paste in Korean cuisine, to a cooking technique such as searing tortillas on a flat top with smoked paprika oil to make dirty tacos. “This program allows our chefs to be innovative and diners can taste and learn something they don’t normally eat,” Cicalese said. “Our dietitians can also educate them on the health and wellness aspect.”

Coming this spring, USF Dining Services will partner with USF Housing & Residential Education for their annual Juniper Nation celebration inside Juniper Dining. The one-day event features food and music from 11 countries chosen by the students. Guests are invited to complete the food passport of the event by tasting a dish from each country. The flagship event will soon expand to the St. Petersburg campus.

Another opportunity for the USF Bulls to try something new is the Produce of the Month program. November is pumpkin, and seasonal produce can be found on the Tampa and St. Petersburg campuses in dining hall dishes and convenience store snacks. There are also pop-up samples that coordinate with product-shaped stress ball giveaways, which have developed a following and their own. Instagram account. In an effort to educate the USF community on produce seasonality and how to cook a healthy meal on a budget, in conjunction with Student Health Services, Argos Exchange hosts cooking demonstrations using Produce of the Month . Next month’s feature is the Pomegranate. “We want to promote the benefits of eating seasonal produce because it’s more sustainable and profitable to use produce that’s more plentiful and travels less,” DiSalvo said.

For more on the upcoming Tastes Around the World feature, check out the menu online for each catering location. keep an eye on Event calendar Where sign up to receive an email newsletter to stay up to date on where to find the product of the month. Contact USF Restoration Services to provide feedback and suggestions on their menus.

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Your journey with the Borg? https://cocinaconcarmen.com/your-journey-with-the-borg/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 20:26:23 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/your-journey-with-the-borg/ The question of the day : Marcus Ericsson won the Borg-Warner Trophy in his native Sweden last week and this week to a warm welcome from his fellow Swedes. If you won the Indianapolis 500 presented by Gainbridge and could take the Borg somewhere for a week, where would it be? Curt Cavin: I expect […]]]>

The question of the day : Marcus Ericsson won the Borg-Warner Trophy in his native Sweden last week and this week to a warm welcome from his fellow Swedes. If you won the Indianapolis 500 presented by Gainbridge and could take the Borg somewhere for a week, where would it be?

Curt Cavin: I expect my answer to be unique, and let me set it up with a story from a few years back. At INDYCAR, we used to use the North American International Auto Show in Detroit every January as a platform to announce sports special news – a new aero kit in 2018 and NTT as the new title sponsor in 2019. We always took the Astor Challenge Cup, the Borg-Warner Trophy and a decorated show car as centerpieces, and one year the Astor Challenge Cup was to go to Detroit in my car . So, I had the rather large trophy at home the night before the trip, and I had it sitting on our kitchen counter, which, as you can imagine, stirred up neighbors looking at it from the other side of the yard! Either way, there was something gratifying about having the cup quietly sitting in my kitchen. Of course, I hadn’t earned it or even earned the right to display it, but at the time it seemed to represent my 30+ years in the sport. So, I have an idea of ​​what I would do with such a trophy if I ever had to claim it. I would enjoy it alone at home with my family, reflecting on the effort and sacrifice it took to earn it.

Joey Barnes: Well, the key word is “special”, which automatically takes Jerry World (AT&T Stadium) out of the realm of possibility – come on Niners! In all seriousness, however, it’s difficult because there are so many unique possibilities, even the next FIFA World Cup has crossed my mind. Honestly, while going back to my hometown of Keller, TX (10 minutes south of Texas Motor Speedway) is probably the safest answer, let’s go to Ireland. I want to see the verdant landscape of the Emerald Isle reflected in the most pristine trophy in all of sport. It would also be something unique to see the Borg-Warner Trophy at Blarney Castle or the Rock of Cashel. A visit to Powerscourt House & Gardens would also be on the table, among many other locations. Somewhere along the way there must be a football match or three, followed by visits to local pubs filled with celebrations and songs. Éirinn go Brách.

Paul Kelly: I’m really torn between two points on this one. One would be the front deck of our family’s camp overlooking Lake Canada in the beautiful Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York. We always welcome friends and neighbors to the deck for a drink and a chat, with plenty of passers-by to greet. What better topic of conversation than the Borg-Warner Trophy? My second place would be on stage at a gig at a local bar with my classic rock/alternative rock band. Friends, family, music lovers and bargoers would walk into a small local bar expecting to hear our raspy noise. They’d understand that, but they’d also see the sport’s greatest trophy on stage all night, right next to the lead singer – me. It would be a dream come true.

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Nigella Lawson makes no apologies with new recipes https://cocinaconcarmen.com/nigella-lawson-makes-no-apologies-with-new-recipes/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 23:39:40 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/nigella-lawson-makes-no-apologies-with-new-recipes/ In her first cookbook, British high priestess Nigella Lawson shared her adamant beliefs about how to eat. “The way everyone really interacts with food is through eating,” she says. “It’s a language that speaks to those who perhaps consider themselves cautious in the kitchen and don’t consider themselves cooks.” With repetition at the heart of […]]]>

In her first cookbook, British high priestess Nigella Lawson shared her adamant beliefs about how to eat.

“The way everyone really interacts with food is through eating,” she says. “It’s a language that speaks to those who perhaps consider themselves cautious in the kitchen and don’t consider themselves cooks.”

With repetition at the heart of comfort, Lawson’s latest collection of recipes, “Cook, eat, repeat: ingredients, recipes and stories“, was born from the four-month confinement in the United Kingdom.

“Ritual and repetition have always been the hallmarks of human society,” she says. She discusses a scrumptious Port and Chestnut Beef Cheek Stew recipe that evokes a Dickensian Christmas, a holiday feast revived in sandwich form, and her love for English strong mustard.

Good Food host Evan Kleiman will join Nigella Lawson chatting on Saturday, November 12 at the Granada Theater in Santa Barbara, and again at the Barclay Theater in Irvine on November 26.


Beef Cheeks with Port and Chestnuts
For 3-4 people

This is a deeply flavored and elegantly cozy stew, perfect for when the nights roll around. It warms body and soul and boosts morale; Eating it feels like instantly sitting in front of a crackling log fire. Show me a stew that isn’t comforting, but this one is also undeniably celebratory. It’s like wearing dress shoes that you can walk in.

Chances are you’ll have to get the beef cheeks from a butcher, and might as well ask them to cut the meat into chunks for you at the same time. After a long, slow cooking, beef cheeks become deliciously tender, but they certainly don’t start out that way: if you’re cutting them yourself, proceed with caution. And if you can’t get beef cheeks, use beef shank.

I often make a horseradish sauce to eat with this, and if you want to do the same, just mix together 3 tablespoons (packed) finely grated fresh horseradish, 3 tablespoons heavy cream, 1/4 cup Greek yogurt with whole milk (or replace the cream and yogurt with 7 tablespoons of fresh cream or sour cream) and add a drop of vinegar and salt to taste. You can make this ahead of time, but just before serving, add a tablespoon or more of finely chopped chives, if desired. However, if you plan to eat the beef cheeks with baked potatoes, then I would increase the amounts of sauce.

Baked potatoes are definitely an easy side dish, and always good, but I have to say my absolute favorite partner for this is the Celeriac and Anchovy Gratin on p.23. And if that’s the plan, you don’t need the horseradish sauce. Either option is rewarding, but which one I choose depends on how much time I have.

Although this is enough for four people, there will probably be no leftovers, but I am happy to cook this when there are three or even two of us. In that case, if you have leftovers, I can happily tell you to lightly shred the meat in its sauce and reheat it gently on the stovetop, adding a little more water as needed, and maybe a little splash of the port you used to cook it. , and turn it into a pasta sauce. If you only have a little bit left, add a little cream.

Warning: this must be done at least one day (and up to 3 days) before you plan to eat it.

Ingredients

  • 2½ pounds of beef cheeks
  • 3–4 large leeks (6¼ cups sliced, white parts only)
  • 2 large garlic cloves
  • 2 carrots (about 2 cups, large pieces)
  • 1 large or 2 small stalks of celery
  • A small bunch of Italian parsley (about 1 cup)
  • 3 tablespoons beef suet or 3 tablespoons oil of your choice
  • 1 orange
  • 1 teaspoon of fennel seeds
  • A very generous grated nutmeg
  • ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons ruby ​​port
  • 1½ cups beef broth
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce (gluten-free if needed)
  • 1 tsp flaky sea salt or kosher salt (or ½ tsp fine sea salt)
  • A good pepper mill
  • 1 cup cooked and peeled chestnuts (I buy them in vacuum bags)

Instructions

  1. Heat the oven to 300°F. Tear off a generous piece of parchment paper a little larger than the diameter of your Dutch oven (I use a 9-inch diameter thick bottom) and set it aside for now.
  2. Cut the beef cheeks into large chunks about 2 ½ inches; if the cheeks are still covered with membrane, cut it carefully and peel it off first. Trim and wash the leeks to remove any mud, if necessary. If your leeks are large, cut them in half lengthwise, then into 1-inch slices; if they are relatively thin, just slice them. Peel the garlic cloves.
  3. Peel the carrots, cut them into pieces, place them in the bowl of the food processor and add the peeled garlic. Tear the celery into small pieces and also add it along with the parsley (leaves and tender stems) and blend until very finely chopped. Or chop everything finely by hand.
  4. Melt 2 tablespoons of beef suet or heat 2 tablespoons of oil in your Dutch oven and, in two batches, brown the meat over medium-high heat, then remove it to a bowl.
  5. Add the remaining tablespoon of suet (or tablespoon of oil) to the pan, reduce the heat to medium-low, then add the carrot mixture and cook, stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes.
  6. Finely grate the orange zest into the pan, stir in the fennel seeds and grate the nutmeg – which smells good when they reach the heat – then add the leeks. Increase the heat to medium and cook, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes, by which time the leeks will have wilted a bit.
  7. Return the meat to the pan, scraping up any juices that have accumulated in the bowl, and stir well to combine.
  8. Pour in the port and allow it to bubble before adding the beef stock, Worcestershire sauce and salt, and pepper generously into the stew. Add the chestnuts, stir well and when it bubbles, mash the meat in the pan with your spoon or spatula so that it is just submerged in the liquid. Crumple up your piece of parchment paper, steam it out and press it over the top of the stew, tucking the edges in and up around the inside of the pan, then put the lid on and bake in the oven for 3 hours, by which time the meat will be beautifully tender. Remove lid and parchment paper and let cool before refrigerating for up to 3 days. Although you should definitely taste the seasoning before letting it get too cold.
  9. To reheat, take the stew out of the fridge, skim off the now solidified fat on top if desired, and let come to room temperature.
  10. If the meat is not just covered with its gelled broth, add a little water so that it is. Tear a sheet of parchment paper to make a new canister and replace the lid and, if serving with the celeriac and anchovy gratin, bake at 375°F for 50 minutes to 1 hour, ensuring that the gratin is on the rack above the Dutch oven. If you want to bake potatoes at the same time, although you’ll have to give them a head start, you can reheat them at 400°F for 40-50 minutes. Make sure the stew is piping hot before serving.

Excerpt from “Cook, Eat, Repeat: Ingredients, Recipes and Stories” by Nigella Lawson. Copyright 2021 Nigella Lawson. Excerpted with permission from Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

“I’m a big fan of cooking ahead, I feel safer knowing there’s food to eat later,” says British cook and writer Nigella Lawson. Photo by Matt Holyoak.


Lawson’s latest recipe collection, “Cook, Eat, Repeat”, was born out of the UK’s four-month lockdown. Photo courtesy of Ecco.

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Strange Clay review – dynamic ceramics | Ceramic https://cocinaconcarmen.com/strange-clay-review-dynamic-ceramics-ceramic/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/strange-clay-review-dynamic-ceramics-ceramic/ strange clay is a wild surprise. Totems chimney pots grow beckoning fingers and toby jug handles. Distant minarets float on the horizon. Curious stumps glow like molten lava. There are post-it notes scribbled with messages of resentment, sea creatures sprawled on the ground, and winged pixies hiding among the foliage of a life-size glade. And […]]]>

strange clay is a wild surprise. Totems chimney pots grow beckoning fingers and toby jug handles. Distant minarets float on the horizon. Curious stumps glow like molten lava. There are post-it notes scribbled with messages of resentment, sea creatures sprawled on the ground, and winged pixies hiding among the foliage of a life-size glade. And everything is made of ceramic.

The Hayward Gallery has seized the moment with this huge exhibition of clay, as the ancient medium has become a contemporary phenomenon. So much so that this show can afford to leave out Ai Weiwei’s priceless Han Dynasty urns. painted with Coca-Cola logos Where Theater doorswith their meditations on African-American politics, to show the work of 23 other international names.

Some are familiar. There’s a modest group of early Grayson Perry potties, so appealing with their gold decals, until you get closer and see the images of abjection, porn and child poverty. There are the small-scale but high-impact objects of the Californian pioneer Ron Nagle, rugged, bumpy surfaces coated in iridescent automotive spray and liquid gold. And almost inevitably there are the elegant whispers of Edmond de Waalin this case, small white porcelain containers gathered in display cases hung so that they look like solid cumulus clouds above you.

Lindsey Mendick’s slug-infested kitchen. Photo: Mark Blower

The oldest artist here is the late American ceramist Betty Woodman (1930-2018), whose work merges painting and sculpture. Woodman was fascinated by the uses of clay, high and low: the Greek urn and bathroom tile, the flowerpot and the terra cotta patio. The images of all are united in its marvelous southern houseaccented with Roman frescoes and brilliant garden center enamels, all flattened into dizzying, colorful shards like a cartoon explosion against the wall.

Its diametrically opposed, in spirit, is an installation by the Chinese artist Liu Jianhua composed of nearly a thousand parts. Regular/Fragile is a catastrophic rain of white porcelain objects that cascade down the walls: shoes, toys, hot water bottles, socks, the soft and tender world made hard, but also alarmingly fragile. Liu created what is effectively a memorial after a devastating plane crash in China, where the relics of human life drifted across the ocean: a wave of consumption that outlasted those who died.

Untitled (Vessel) by Magdalene Odundo.
Untitled (Vessel) by Magdalene Odundo. Photo: Mark Blower

Contemporary art uses clay against itself sometimes, or at least counter-intuitively. Telephones, sinks, excrement, all cast in clay. The London-born artist Lindsey Mendick has a whole house full of ceramic vermin, from cockroaches in the kitchen to slugs on the walls and what appears to be an octopus emerging from the toilet. She is also the artist of the Post-it war waged by the couple who live here; marriage, in Mendick, a fragile domestic hell.

Many of these works remind you of how ceramic our world is. The artist born in Tanzania Lubna Chowdhary paints geometric abstractions on oversized tiles, deploying the fundamental grid you might find on a floor or in a shower. Serena KordaThe gigantic necklace of ceramic beads that spreads out in the gallery is inspired by the myth of Parthenope, a mermaid who fills the Bay of Naples with her tears.

The immaculate art of the natives of Kenya Madeleine Odundo starts with the humble vessel – a pot, a vase, a jug – and gives each a unique personality of its own. They lean forward, they bow, they seem to be listening, their mouths open; their curves carry notes of pregnancy. Each is baked and burnished in its characteristic reds and blacks and each transforms a functional object into an eloquent anthropomorphic sculpture.

Odundo is remarkable here, in so many ways, not least because his work is such an immaculate and inventive extension of age-old techniques. The totem pole artist, jonathan baldock, also references the history of clay with its chimney pots and wastebaskets spitting out ceramic buttons and supermarket tokens. All are incised with designs, much like ancient clay tablets, except Baldock replaces the intricate beauty of cuneiform writing with today’s wordless emojis.

The fragility of clay is little exploited, unless we consider Rachel Kneepadthe tangles of white porcelain ribbons, limbs, vines and unnamed organic shapes suspended by a thread from the ceiling. Here and there in the casting process, the threat of cracking emerges explicitly. But so often in this show the material is disguised, its vulnerability disappearing in the novelty of, say, strange, heavily painted creatures positioned as garden gnomes in Klara Kristalovaforest glade.

Gigantism reigns. Gigantic installations, muckle shapes, massive blocks of clay. The greatest work here is a ceramic facsimile of a giant squid (the Architeuthis), which can reach 14 meters in length. Until relatively recently, he was only ever seen as a carcass washed up on a beach. This is exactly how artist David Zink Yi presents his huge facsimile, like a dead creature on the gallery floor, its marbled surface like exquisite Florentine paper. But this leisurely feat is undermined somewhat by the pool of ink seeping around him, which looks nothing like Halloween goo.

David Zink Yi's facsimile of a giant squid.
“Giganticism Prevails”: David Zink Yi’s ceramic facsimile of a giant squid. Photo: Mark Blower

The wind turns upside down with the most delicate installation, titled My place is the placelessby the artist of Iranian origin Shahpour Pouyan. It’s a floating horizon of beautifully inventive domes, roofs and minarets, all miniature inventions, but all speaking of real-world architecture. Royal palaces, mosques, office buildings, tiny huts, everything is presented on the same level, on the same scale and in the same earthly material.

Pouyan began working on the piece after taking a DNA test that revealed ancestry extending far beyond Iran, to 33 countries. My feeling is that his piece is a subtle argument against nationalism, theocracy, feudalism and race, replacing these tyrannical structures with those formed from humble clay.

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CHRONICLE: Cooking ghost stories from years past in the kitchen https://cocinaconcarmen.com/chronicle-cooking-ghost-stories-from-years-past-in-the-kitchen/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/chronicle-cooking-ghost-stories-from-years-past-in-the-kitchen/ “Entering these buildings still standing can be like stepping into another time and place where the history and influence of that past becomes visceral,” writes the food columnist It was a dark and stormy night… Always a classic start for a scary story or stories of suspense and the paranormal. I mean, it’s the season. […]]]>

“Entering these buildings still standing can be like stepping into another time and place where the history and influence of that past becomes visceral,” writes the food columnist

It was a dark and stormy night…

Always a classic start for a scary story or stories of suspense and the paranormal. I mean, it’s the season.

Halloween is almost here and all that goes with it. Ghouls, goblins, witches and ghosts!

As the leaves fall, the veil between our mortal realm and the shady place just outside our field of vision also disappears. What a great time for a good ghost story.

Personally, I’ve always been a bit fascinated by stories and macabre tales of supernatural and paranormal experiences. I grew up with Scooby-Doo, classic monster movies, The hilarious house of Frightenstein – which instilled a love for Vincent Price’s work throughout his life and is still a guilty pleasure – and shows how The twilight zone and Scary Canada.

I wouldn’t go so far as to claim to have definitive proof of the existence of ghosts and an afterlife, but I have had a few experiences that got me thinking.

During my cooking career, I have worked in many places that share long and colorful histories. So many great stories about the formation of our towns and villages involve the many local taverns and inns that have sprung up along the newly laid roads and rails that meandered through the countryside.

Along with a long history also comes the generations of energy and influences of the people who have occupied these spaces and places. Stepping into these still standing buildings can be like stepping into another time and place where the history and influence of that past becomes visceral.

In the fall of 2001, I found myself working at the historic Bala Bay Inn. I had accepted a position during the shoulder season and was fortunate that the position came with housing.

The Inn was originally built and opened by “Muskoka Bard” EB Sutton in 1910 as the Swastika Hotel. An unfortunate name as history would show, but back then a swastika in Sanskrit meant good luck. The 1930s and the rise of the Nazis and the corruption of the symbol would see the name change.

In 1908, in order to see his vision come to fruition, Sutton negotiated with Bala’s founder, Thomas Burgess, to sell him a section of shoreline along Bala Bay. It took time and was convincing, but Burgess caved on one condition: alcohol must never be served on the property. EB, himself a devout abstainer, agreed to the terms and faithfully carried them out.

The impressive and modern three-story hotel opened on July 17, 1910 and was an immediate hit with affluent tourists and adventure travelers of the time. The structure was built of brick – the first of its kind in Muskoka. Sadly EB died in 1917 and with him the promise not to serve alcohol on site.

This is where the story takes a paranormal turn. Sitting at the bar and if you ask the old town folks, it was almost immediately after the hotel received its first official license to serve alcohol that the EB tours began. There are many stories of staff and guests over the years.

Nocturnal visitors, watching figures, and strange feelings are all reported at various times. I experienced several strange things during my stay there. Since it was shoulder season, there were many nights when I was the only person in the building. Several times I’ve caught a shadow moving or feeling weird, but the weirdest thing was the morning one of the room cleaners asked me if I’d been to 319. That’s the room where EB stayed and died.

I hadn’t gone up to the third floor at all and asked why. The housekeeper had a very strange look on her face and said, “Well, someone was.” It seems that there is on the bed in 319 a clearly distinctive imprint on the bedspread, as if someone was sitting and looking at the bay. …I guess he never left the hotel.

Several years later, I was lucky enough to meet a man whose fascination with our great ghost stories would become one of my favorite TV shows. Terry Boyle is the author of several books including his haunted canada series where various places are explored by him and documented. He also hosted Scary Canadaaired on the Discovery Channel from 2002 to 2006. Sadly, Terry passed away in July 2016, but his spirit lives on in the many books and shows that give us a glimpse behind the dark veil on the other side.

In the spirit of Halloween and things that happen at night, I came across a unique event right here in Barrie that combines all the elements of a freaking good time. Food, theater and chaos. Talk is Free Theater presents The Blood Trilogy.

Created by Michael Torontow and Griffin Hewitt, it is an immersive site-specific theater experience.

By asking the question “Do centuries of age send powers that mere modernity cannot kill?”

This presentation adapts one of literature’s great horror novels, written in blood and takes the audience on a journey through the horror stories of the past as they suddenly come to the shores of our present; confusing what is real, who to trust, and how to survive in a new world of old horrors. Click here for more information.

Hope you and your families have a happy and safe Halloween this year. There’s a freakishly good time waiting for you there!

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Ordinary people were also civil rights heroes. This is the story of a city’s fight https://cocinaconcarmen.com/ordinary-people-were-also-civil-rights-heroes-this-is-the-story-of-a-citys-fight/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 14:09:00 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/ordinary-people-were-also-civil-rights-heroes-this-is-the-story-of-a-citys-fight/ Earlier this year, when I started to pitch the idea of ​​profiling members of the civil rights generation, I had no idea that I would end up telling my own family’s story. I’m used to being a voice for others and giving them a platform, but not putting the spotlight on my loved ones. The […]]]>

Earlier this year, when I started to pitch the idea of ​​profiling members of the civil rights generation, I had no idea that I would end up telling my own family’s story.

I’m used to being a voice for others and giving them a platform, but not putting the spotlight on my loved ones.

The more I thought about it, however, it made sense to look a little closer to home. My mother, Phyllis Jones, and my uncle, Ben Thorpe, lived through the tumultuous desegregation of my family’s hometown. They don’t appear in any history books. Their stories are not unique. But, in a country that still struggles mightily against race and the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow, stories like theirs show that the past is not dead. It’s alive and breathing and close.

This is what made me want to start profiling members of the “civil rights generation”. These names you know like Fred Graya lawyer for Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. And the ones you don’t like, like my mom, Phyllis, and my uncle, whom I call Uncle Anthony.

Ordinary people have had extraordinary times. And we must never forget.

When change came, it came painfully slow

While interviewing my mother and uncle, I realized that there was so much that even I didn’t know about their experiences.

They grew up in the 1960s and 1970s in the small rural town of Oxford, North Carolina, about 30 miles from Durham, even now Oxford looks a bit like Mayberry from The Andy Griffith Show, with a picturesque town center and many fields and farm animals on the outskirts. At the time, tobacco was the cash crop.

After the 1954 Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education ruling segregation in public schools was unconstitutional, and after the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964, laws in much of the country were changing. But Oxford was not.

<strong>At the top</strong> : The Masonic Home for Children, known as the White Orphanage, in Oxford, North Carolina <strong>At the bottom left</strong> : A view of Oxford city center near Main Street.  <strong>At the bottom right</strong> : the Central Children’s Home of North Carolina in Oxford.” srcset=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/5bc8299/2147483647/strip/true/crop/3000×3020+0+0/resize/1760×1772!/ quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmedia.npr.org%2Fassets%2Fimg%2F2022%2F10%2F21%2Fayesha-composite-3_custom-0a46e12d6cbf854965a7c2e74d16cda27f311c4d.jpg 2x” width=”880″ height=”886″ src=”https://npr.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/0b05d58/2147483647/strip/true/crop/3000×3020+0+0/resize/880×886!/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F %2Fmedia.npr.org%2Fassets%2Fimg%2F2022%2F10%2F21%2Fayesha-composite-3_custom-0a46e12d6cbf854965a7c2e74d16cda27f311c4d.jpg” loading=”lazy” bad-src=”data:image/svg+xml;base64,PHN2ZyB4bWxucz0iaHR0cDovL3d3dy53My5vcmcvMjAwMC9zdmciIHZlcnNpb249IjEuMSIgaGVpZ2h0PSI4ODZweCIgd2lkdGg9Ijg4MHB4Ij48L3N2Zz4=” /></p>
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/ Cornell Watson for NPR

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Cornell Watson for NPR

High: The Masonic Home for Children, known as the White Orphanage, in Oxford, NC At the bottom left: A view of Oxford city center near Main Street. At the bottom right: The Central Children’s Home of North Carolina in Oxford.

The tentacles of racism and segregation appeared in the lives of my mother and her siblings in the most mundane interactions. For example, for a time they lived next door to a poor white family.

“The house next to us – it was the white family, and [the kids] played with us. But they wouldn’t play with us in public. They only played with us at home because we were black, so they couldn’t openly show that we were very good friends,” my mother said. “If we had gone out, they didn’t know us.

Until we spoke for this story, I didn’t know my mom had been through this.

Not only that, but just going to the store with my grandmother was an ordeal.

“I always remember that we used to go to the 5 and 10 cent store. Mom taught us a lesson. She told us not to move,” my mother recalls. “She was telling us not to move, to stay still. And we had to wait in the back in the corner, and then the waitress would take her time, and we [had] to go back to the car and eat the food.”

She said she remembered wondering why white people could sit down, but they couldn’t.

“But because of the way my mother raised us, we didn’t question it.”

My uncle Anthony added: “I think that’s why my mother, when she went shopping, she left us in front of the church. And my mother would park under those shady trees and leave us there while she went shopping in town. It was very rare in our younger years that she let us go with her to town because she was so scared. She was so scared that something was going to happen.”

The murder of a black man would change everything

In 1970, something happened in Oxford, just opposite my great-grandfather’s house.

A young black man, Henry “Dickie” Marrow, was brutally murdered outside a local store by white store owners who accused him of saying something they didn’t like to a white woman.

/ Cornell Watson for NPR

/

Cornell Watson for NPR

The store where Henry Marrow was shot.

Thanks to fellow Oxford native Ben Chavis, this murder changed the city forever.

Unlike my mother and my uncle, you will be read about Chavis in the history books. He’s a civil rights leader. He was a carded member of the NAACP at age 12 and would go on to become president of the organization.

At age 14, Chavis was the youth coordinator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, led by Martin Luther King, Jr. So when Marrow was killed, Chavis, in his early twenties, was already a seasoned organizer.

After an all-white jury acquitted the men who shot Marrow, Chavis decided it was time to act.

The facade of Soul Kitchen, a club once owned by Dr. Ben Chavis.

/ Cornell Watson for NPR

/

Cornell Watson for NPR

The facade of Soul Kitchen, a club once owned by Dr. Ben Chavis.

“We led a march from Oxford to Raleigh, which is about 45 miles, and we started with maybe a few hundred people. By the time we got to Raleigh, we had over 3,000 people in the march. .,” Chavis said.

At that time, black people had to shop at white-owned businesses in Oxford. So Chavis and others decided to hit white people in town where it hurt: their wallets.

“People knew that something had to be done, otherwise it was going to happen again. And we said to ourselves why spend our money with people who don’t respect us? Why spend our money in a municipality that refuses to hire? ” Chavis said.

My mom and uncle were around 12 and 10 at the time. My grandparents didn’t tell them about the murder, but they do remember the boycott and the fact that they had to shop in nearby Roxboro.

It was also a time of trouble. Protesters burned white-owned businesses and tobacco crops. In response, city officials instituted a curfew. It was a scary time for my family because my grandfather, who was a nurse, was working late at the local hospital.

“We stayed up until my dad came home because we knew he was leaving – either he was getting arrested by the state troopers or he was getting arrested by the local cop or even by the FBI,” Uncle Anthony said.

Fortunately, my grandfather always got home safely. And after months of boycotting, change has finally come to Oxford.

“A lot of our requests have been met,” Chavis said. “People found jobs downtown, many for the first time in their lives. And they’re still working there. So we desegregated a lot of the city. A lot of stores that refused to desegregate closed. Like , the theater, rather than desegregate, just closed.”

Change came to schools, but black children still faced bomb threats

And change has also come to separate schools. In the midst of it all, in the fall of 1970, Uncle Anthony was part of a test group of black children sent to a white school. He was in third. He remembers being afraid to get on the school bus.

“Now we were on a bus with mixed races. We didn’t know anything about it,” Uncle Anthony said. “They did. They assigned seats. So they got us all together.”

So, even taking steps to “desegregate”, children were still separated by race on the bus. And the tensions didn’t stop there.

“Every day we received bomb threats,” he said. “A lot of people in the community didn’t want us in the all-white school.”

It was something else I didn’t know about – my uncle, at 10, facing bomb threats just for going to school.

These are stories that have shaped the history of our family and ultimately the history of this country.

My grandparents didn’t openly talk about these things with their children. They did this to protect them. My mom and her siblings just want people to know the truth.

“I wanted my kids to know what happened so you can tell your kids and so on,” my mom said. “But also, I wanted them to know the history so that they could pursue an even better life than our parents or our grandparents. If you know your history, then you understand things a lot better.”

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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5 Places to Explore Canada’s Indigenous Food Culture https://cocinaconcarmen.com/5-places-to-explore-canadas-indigenous-food-culture/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 20:42:00 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/5-places-to-explore-canadas-indigenous-food-culture/ Comment this story Comment grow in Toronto, my knowledge of Aboriginal communities was limited to a few days of history lessons. In school textbooks, descriptions of the past were suspect, haloed with a now familiar rhetoric of the “white saviour”. Indigenous peoples in Canada have been trying to reclaim their culture from church and government […]]]>

Comment

grow in Toronto, my knowledge of Aboriginal communities was limited to a few days of history lessons. In school textbooks, descriptions of the past were suspect, haloed with a now familiar rhetoric of the “white saviour”.

Indigenous peoples in Canada have been trying to reclaim their culture from church and government for nearly two centuries. The atrocities they had to deal with Europeans usurping land to forcibly removing children from their homes in abusive boarding schools.

In recent years, emphasis has been placed on reconciliationland recognition, improved education within Indigenous communities, and increased Indigenous-led tourism, much of which is food-focused.

‘It’s not a trend’: Native American chefs resist ‘colombization’ of Indigenous foods

Paul Natrall of the Squamish Nation is one of the leaders of the Indigenous movement for culinary tourism. He is a chef, restaurant owner, television presenter and member of the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada. He is also the British Columbia representative for the Indigenous Culinary of Associated Nations, a chef-led organization that focuses on using food to influence Canada’s relationship with Indigenous culture.

To this year cook camp, an annual celebration of Canadian cuisine by cooks, for cooks, Natrall hosted a special event that blended traditional Indigenous foods with European techniques. According to him, food is the perfect catalyst for people to connect and heal.

“Growing up, the kitchen was a place of bonding,” Natrall said with a smile. “Food was medicine and time [together as a family] was the food.

Thanksgiving dishes have deep Indigenous roots beyond the first feast

He reflects fondly on the traditional cooking methods he learned from his grandmother: how he wind-dried salmon, roasted beets in the earth, and grilled mussels straight from the sea. of pride, love and belonging as they cooked side by side. Unfortunately, these hunting, gathering and cooking practices were largely discouraged by a government that aimed to eradicate Indigenous culture nationwide.

“It’s important to keep our food culture alive,” he says. “In any city, you can find many styles of food: Chinese, Thai, Italian… but you never get native food. These traditional [cooking] the methods have been around for thousands of years, and we need to enhance them – revive them – show the world our culture. We’re finally starting to see more of this.

Through educational meals and outdoor activities that involve traditional methods of gathering, preparing and cooking food, Canada’s Indigenous community offers tourists a way to better understand and connect with their culture.

Pick and Grill with the Three Fires Confederacy in Ontario

Back to menu

Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory is a First Nations reserve located on Manitoulin Island in Ontario, east of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Composed of the Three Fires Confederacy (Ojibwa, Odawa and Pottawatomi nations), Wikwemikong Tourism hosts and organizes outings, including fishing, maple syrup harvesting, portage, powwow and theater trips.

They also offer culinary excursions such as hiking along the scenic Bebamikawe Memorial Trail while searching for edibles and natural ingredients along the forest floor. With a First Nations guide, guests learn to identify and harvest ingredients like mushrooms and berries and pair them with wild game, fish, birds, and hot and cold teas made from herbs and plants. At the end of the day, guests will prepare their discoveries over an open fire.

A local’s guide to Toronto

Visit Nk’Mip Wine Estate in British Columbia

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Nk’Mip Cellars stands out as the first native winery in North America, owned and operated by the Osoyoos Indian Band. It is located in the Okanagan Valley, one of Canada’s prized wine regions. This scenic vineyard is nestled between rolling hills and a sparkling lake and proudly practices sustainable agriculture. Nk’Mip Cellars has also won numerous accolades for its high-quality reds, buttery whites and crisp rosés.

Visitors to the winery can sample flights in the main tasting bar or indulge in a semi-private tasting with chef-inspired pairings. For a more in-depth experience, guests can book the Four Chiefs Dining Experience, which explores four key elements of Indigenous cuisine (bear, salmon, bitter root and serviceberry) with Nk’Mip wine pairings.

Recently, Nk’Mip Cellars launched a tasting experience at the District Wine Village in Oliver, BC — Canada’s first wine village — which features 16 distinct Okanagan artisans and artisan producers.

A local guide in Vancouver

Book a high-end meal at Naagan in Ontario

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Founded by Ojibwa Chief Zach Keeshig, Naagan is an exclusive restaurant that only operates on weekends and sells out weeks in advance. Keeshig, who has cooked at top Canadian restaurants such as Langdon Hall and Eigensinn Farm, creatively fuses modern cuisine with traditional Ojibwa dishes. By limiting seating to just 13 people, Keeshig can guide diners through the ingredients, cooking methods and cultural significance of each unique dish he prepares.

Located in Owen Sound, the furthest in southern Ontario, Naagan offers a nine-course tasting menu which incorporates forage ingredients such as corn or peaches in the summer, and carrots or beets in the fall.

Keeshig also organizes foraging tours, cooking demonstrations and private dinners.

Attend an Algonquin Festival near Ottawa

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Mādahòkì Farm was built on Algonquin Nation lands near Canada’s capital. Officially launched in 2021, the space hosts a year-round series of events celebrating Algonquin language and culture by season: Sīgwan (spring), Tagwàgi (fall), Pibòn (winter) and the annual Solstice Indigenous Festival in ‘summer.

Each event features traditional Algonquin foods, music, powwows and creative workshops where families can make dreamcatchers, drum, participate in storytelling or participate in a powwow.

This exciting event space and working farm is also home to five endangered Ojibwe Spirit horses and hosts a year-round Aboriginal market that promotes products such as art, jewelry, coffee or soaps, made by local indigenous artisans.

Fish and enjoy the trails around Red Bank Lodge in New Brunswick

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Belonging to the Red Bank Nation, the Red Bank Lodge is perched on a hill overlooking the Miramichi River. The large cedar cabin nestled in a thick evergreen forest was built by the local Aboriginal community. Wildlife grazes quietly along the quiet walking paths that wind through the trees and along the river.

River Bank Lodge is renowned for its Atlantic salmon fishing, attracting anglers from all over the world. His culinary fishing experience – priced around $1,400 – includes accommodations, Native-led fishing trips, and Mi’kmaq meals of smoked fish and shellfish, or boiled meats like venison or beef. caribou. Fishing season runs from mid-April through October, and these experiences book up months in advance.

For more information on Canada’s Indigenous tourism offerings, visit: https://IndigenousTourism.ca/

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