Cooking tip – Cocina Con Carmen http://cocinaconcarmen.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 17:04:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-24T184718.286.png Cooking tip – Cocina Con Carmen http://cocinaconcarmen.com/ 32 32 Tips from local chefs for your Thanksgiving dinner https://cocinaconcarmen.com/tips-from-local-chefs-for-your-thanksgiving-dinner/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 17:04:16 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/tips-from-local-chefs-for-your-thanksgiving-dinner/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) — Thanksgiving is just days away, which means many people will be planning their Thanksgiving dinner recipe strategies. KELOLAND News reached out to two local chefs, Chef Ellen and Chef Jeni, who took the time to tell us about their favorite Thanksgiving dishes and gave us some insight into their tips […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) — Thanksgiving is just days away, which means many people will be planning their Thanksgiving dinner recipe strategies.

KELOLAND News reached out to two local chefs, Chef Ellen and Chef Jeni, who took the time to tell us about their favorite Thanksgiving dishes and gave us some insight into their tips for making them!

Chef Helen

Chef Ellen is a native of Sioux Falls, who moved out of state in 2013 to attend cooking school in Colorado.

After graduating and moving back to Sioux Falls, I worked in local restaurants for several years before settling down with my husband and two boys. I missed the culinary world too much, and chef Ellen was born as a personal home chef service in 2018,” she says.

In 2020 (mid-pandemic), the doors to our storefront have opened, where we offer take-out meals for one, two or the whole family, with a focus on diet and allergy-friendly dishes, and by sharing our love of food with both public and private cooking classes.

When asked about her favorite Thanksgiving dishes, Chef Ellen first gave a rather unique answer:

Cucumber salad. It may not be a traditional side dish, but I remember it gracing the dinner table for the holiday meal for as long as I can remember, and it has always been a favorite. Besides being a great way to get some extra veggies on your plate, there are plenty of easy ways to tweak the recipe for the basic Italian dressing with cucumber and onion slices that most of us know.

This was followed by a much more traditional fare:

Mashed potatoes. Full disclosure, these weren’t always a favorite. In fact, I don’t remember liking potatoes very much until I spent an entire week preparing (and eating) them at cooking school. Holiday potatoes call for more butter and cream, but you can boil celeriac or parsnips with the potatoes for a pop of flavor aside from the regular garlic or Parmesan flavor additions.

Chef Ellen also provided recipes for her take on the two dishes listed above:

Cucumber caprese saladToss sliced ​​cucumber with halved cherry tomatoes, pearl mozzarella balls and torn fresh basil. Toss with great-tasting olive oil, salt and pepper, and garnish with a balsamic reduction for a side dish everyone will love! Prepare this dish just before dinnertime so the balsamic doesn’t stain the cucumber. English cucumbers (sometimes called greenhouse cucumbers) have thinner skins and smaller seeds, and are often preferred for cucumber salads.

Mashed potatoes Mix 1 lb of potatoes with 1/2 lb of parsnips and 1/2 lb of celeriac. Make sure the ingredients are peeled and cut roughly the same size. Cover with water in a saucepan and boil until easily pierced with a fork. Drain and toss with salt, pepper, heavy cream and butter until desired consistency. Garlic, cream cheese, parmesan, sour cream and herbs can all be added as desired.

You can find the Chef Helen storefront at 2210 W. 69th St #130, Sioux Falls.

Chief Jeni

Chef Jeni runs Dinner Birdie, a Sioux Falls-based meal service.

I started my career over 25 years ago working for a caterer as a preparer and waiter. When I started on my own, I cooked right in people’s kitchens, making them meals for their fridges and freezers.,” she explained.

Caterers quickly took over the majority of my business, but then when the pandemic canceled almost all of our parties, we went back to our roots and started Dinner Birdie to give the business a lifeline and good people homemade dishes!

At Birdie Dinner, Chef Jeni and her team take comforting family recipes and prepare them in small batches for people to take home and cook.It’s a different experience from restaurant cooking because you’re sitting at your own table and pulling a nice pot of home-cooked food out of your oven like you’ve been working in the kitchen all day. Your home, family and friends eat together without the hassle of cooking or grocery shopping.!”

Chief Jeni calls Thanksgiving the ultimate celebration of family, friends, and food.

“When it comes to Thanksgiving, I’m a traditionalist.”

She says her food isn’t fancy and the goal isn’t to “step it up a notch,” but rather: to make her taste like mom or grandma (if she was a great cook) and to remind you why you’re getting together.”

With that in mind, Chef Jeni had a simple dish as her favorite dish.

For me, the pinnacle of the meal is the sauce. I learned from a great teacher. The first time I had his sauce, I wanted to eat it like a big bowl of soup, it was so good.

His advice for the best sauce?

It needs to have the right consistency and blend of flavors so you can pour it over the mashed potatoes and, let’s be honest, everything else on the plate. A good sauce is when you know you’ve nailed Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving is about being with people, about passing on the traditions of those who came before us to those who will be here after us. I’m not trying to make Thanksgiving better. Some things don’t need to be changed or changed. On the contrary, I am simply trying to make Thanksgiving more of itself! We only eat this meal once a year, so I’m just saying do your best to reminisce about old memories and create new ones.said Chef Jeni.

You can find Birdie dinner at 3638 S. Southeastern Ave. Sioux Falls.

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Hunting & Cooking: Turkey Soup and Dumplings https://cocinaconcarmen.com/hunting-cooking-turkey-soup-and-dumplings/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 19:02:48 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/hunting-cooking-turkey-soup-and-dumplings/ In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this week I’m highlighting a turkey recipe. Nothing brightens up a melancholic day better than comfort food, and there’s no better comfort food than wild turkey and dumplins! For this recipe, I used the thigh of a Rio Grande turkey that I harvested during the spring hunt. I know the […]]]>

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this week I’m highlighting a turkey recipe. Nothing brightens up a melancholic day better than comfort food, and there’s no better comfort food than wild turkey and dumplins!

For this recipe, I used the thigh of a Rio Grande turkey that I harvested during the spring hunt. I know the leg looks a little battered, but this particular turkey was shot in the leg. I could have used the other leg of the turkey, but I wanted to share a little trick I learned while cleaning this turkey: when you clean shotgunned animals, you can end up with a lot of pellets in your meat. To extract the pellets, find the holes on the surface of the meat where the BB entered and follow its path. Your meat will end up looking a bit battered, like this leg, but I didn’t bite any BBs during the meal. Biting on a BB can be a real end to a meal!

Turkey thighs can be a little tough. I tried roasting them, and I didn’t like the texture. But in soup, they shine: after slow cooking all day, they become tender and tasty. This is one of those meals that you can start in the morning before you leave for work and finish it when you get home in the evening. There’s nothing better at the end of a cold winter’s day than walking in the door and being hit by the smells of turkey soup simmering all day – so good!

Turkey soup and meatballs

Ingredients
* 2 carrots
* 2 stalks of celery
* 1 medium sized onion
* 9 chicken stock cubes
* ¼ cup butter
* Wild turkey leg and thigh (with bone)
* 3 tablespoons of fresh marjoram
* 1 packet of fresh tarragon
* 7 bay leaves
* 8 cups of water
* 1 liter heavy cream
* 4 boxes of refrigerated Pilsbury buttermilk biscuits
* 1 tablespoon cornstarch
* Black pepper to taste

Instructions

1. Chop carrots, celery stalks and onion. Put with butter in the slow cooker.

2. Add the turkey leg and nine chicken stock cubes.

3. Chop and add marjoram, tarragon and bay leaves. Pour 8 cups of water. Cover and put the slow cooker on high.

4. After eight hours, remove the turkey leg and shred it: discard the bone and return the turkey meat to the pot.

5. Transfer the soup to a large pot. Mix one tablespoon of cornstarch with half a cup of soup base.

6. Add the dissolved cornstarch to the saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and stir until thickened.

7. Break the biscuits into three or four pieces and drop them into the pot. Cover and simmer for ten minutes.

8. Stir, then simmer for another ten minutes.

9. Uncover and add heavy cream. Mix until incorporated.

10. Cut a slice of thick crust bread and enjoy!!!
Lindsey Bartosh, an eighth-generation Moab, enjoys hiking, hunting, fishing, cooking, writing, photography, and working on her website www.huntingandcooking.com.

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A nutritionist suggests a way to balance the impact of smoked and barbecued meat on the body https://cocinaconcarmen.com/a-nutritionist-suggests-a-way-to-balance-the-impact-of-smoked-and-barbecued-meat-on-the-body/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 08:39:12 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/a-nutritionist-suggests-a-way-to-balance-the-impact-of-smoked-and-barbecued-meat-on-the-body/ Include salads in your diet to better balance your meals Do you like to gorge on smoked and grilled meats? If yes, then you should pay attention to the advice of nutritionist Anjali Mukerjee. According to nutritionists, smoking, frying, broiling, broiling, baking and roasting at high temperatures “produces loads of HCAs (essentially harmful chemicals) in […]]]>

Include salads in your diet to better balance your meals

Do you like to gorge on smoked and grilled meats? If yes, then you should pay attention to the advice of nutritionist Anjali Mukerjee. According to nutritionists, smoking, frying, broiling, broiling, baking and roasting at high temperatures “produces loads of HCAs (essentially harmful chemicals) in meats.” In an Instagram post, Anjali outlines the impact of smoked meats on the body along with ways to lessen the impact.

The health expert explains that heterocyclic amines (HCAs) can damage “heart muscles” and “genetic material/DNA”. In addition, it accelerates the aging process of cells and subsequently of the body. Anjali Mukerjee also adds that consumption of smoked, barbecued or grilled meat over a period of time increases the risk of “breast cancer in postmenopausal women”. This risk is only multiplied in women, who consume less fruit and vegetables (anti-oxidants) in their diet. In addition to heterocyclic amines (HCA), “the high saturated fat content of these meats also contributes to causing cancer and heart disease”, adds the nutritionist.

How can you reduce the impact of these harmful chemicals on your body? Nutritionist Anjali Mukerjee offers a solution

1) Eat smoked and barbecued meats occasionally and “don’t make them the centerpiece of your meals.”

2) Then the nutritionist suggests balancing it with the consumption of raw salads and fruits in the same meal.

3) The third trick is to “squeeze lemon on top and serve with a salad of raw onions and radishes”. Indeed, their antioxidant effect will neutralize some of the damage caused.

Meanwhile, you can always swear by the healthy ways to cook meat, which include stewing, boiling, steaming, sautéing, and simmering.

Disclaimer: This content, including advice, provides generic information only. It does not in any way replace qualified medical advice. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim any responsibility for this information.

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Best Thanksgiving Rolls Recipe – How To Make Thanksgiving Rolls https://cocinaconcarmen.com/best-thanksgiving-rolls-recipe-how-to-make-thanksgiving-rolls/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 20:57:36 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/best-thanksgiving-rolls-recipe-how-to-make-thanksgiving-rolls/ A hot, freshly baked little bread is one of the biggest highlights of the holidays. If you’ve never tried making them from scratch, this simple and easy recipe is for you. With just a few simple ingredients and a bit of free time, you can have soft, buttery buns not only for thanksgiving dinnerbut at […]]]>

A hot, freshly baked little bread is one of the biggest highlights of the holidays. If you’ve never tried making them from scratch, this simple and easy recipe is for you. With just a few simple ingredients and a bit of free time, you can have soft, buttery buns not only for thanksgiving dinnerbut at any time of the year.

This recipe recommends a stand mixer for mixing and kneading, but don’t worry if you don’t have one! You can mix the dough with a wooden spoon or a rubber spatula and knead by hand. You’ll mix and knead for as long as the recipe calls for, and you’ll get a bonus arm workout in the process.

Here’s a useful shaping trick: I use my left index finger to poke under the ball of dough, while wrapping my right thumb and index finger around the ball of dough to shape it into a smooth ball, then pinch the seams lower together.

If you want to prepare them in advance, you have three options:

– The dough can be made where you place the shaped puddings in the mold and stored in the refrigerator, covered, for up to 12 hours. Three hours before you plan to bake the buns, remove them from the refrigerator, keep them covered, and let rise at room temperature for about 1 to 2 hours.
– The dough can also be frozen. Prepare the recipe until you form and place the rolls in the pan. At this point, you can cover them with plastic wrap and freeze them for up to 2 months. Once frozen, they can be taken out of the pan and placed in a freezer bag. Six hours before baking, take them out of the freezer, place them in the baking dish, cover, then let them thaw and rise for about 4 to 5 hours. Bake as directed.
– Finished rolls can also be frozen. Let the finished rolls come to room temperature, place them in freezer bags, then freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw in refrigerator or at room temperature, then reheat in 300° oven until warmed through, about 10 minutes.

    Did you do this? Let us know how it went in the comments below!

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What are the crucial races in the 2022 midterm elections? Robert Gehrke explains what to watch on election night. https://cocinaconcarmen.com/what-are-the-crucial-races-in-the-2022-midterm-elections-robert-gehrke-explains-what-to-watch-on-election-night/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 12:01:06 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/what-are-the-crucial-races-in-the-2022-midterm-elections-robert-gehrke-explains-what-to-watch-on-election-night/ No matter who you are, tracking election night results can be overwhelming. There’s a lot of information coming in at once and it’s hard to get a good read on what it all means. So I’ve put together a kind of midterm election how-to guide to get you ready to watch Tuesday night’s results like […]]]>

No matter who you are, tracking election night results can be overwhelming. There’s a lot of information coming in at once and it’s hard to get a good read on what it all means.

So I’ve put together a kind of midterm election how-to guide to get you ready to watch Tuesday night’s results like a pro – or at least give you an idea of ​​the six most important things I’ll pay attention to after the closing of the polls.

As my colleague and data scientist Andy Larsen has documented, attendance was rather poor so far and it has been made worse, it seems, by the slow processing of ballots.

Some context is important here, however.

Midterm elections never see the turnout we see in presidential years. So don’t expect to see 90% turnout from 2020 or 82% in 2016. We shouldn’t even expect 76% midterm turnout in 2018 because, bear in mind Mind that there were three ballot initiatives — medical marijuana, Medicaid expansion, and independent redistricting — that drove people to the polls. Realistically, I would expect about 2/3 of voters to vote.

We are able to know who voted earlier. Early voters leaned older and more Republican than normal, but toward the end of last week the margins tightened as ballots from younger, more progressive voters began to appear.

It’s also worth remembering that – at least in the race for the top of the ticket, Sen. Mike Lee vs. Evan McMullin – a strong Republican turnout isn’t necessarily a death knell, since McMullin hopes to win up to a third of those GOP voters.

The Democrats will lose the United States House of Representatives. It’s been clear for a while and the only question is by how much. So we will focus on the US Senate.

Polls close in Georgia at 5 p.m. PDT, so I’ll be watching the early counts in the race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP challenger Herschel Walker. The polls have closed this race – which is a bit disconcerting, given Walker’s missteps, exaggerations, repeated lies and, oh yeah, allegedly having paid for several abortionsdespite his support for a near total ban on the procedure.

So I think that’s a litmus test for raw partisan turnout in a swing state. Pay special attention to suburban Atlanta. When the Democrats made the state blue two years ago, it was the high turnout in these “suburbs” that pushed them to the top.

Every race and every state is different, but if this one turns Walker’s way, it could be the first signs of a red tide, a flipped Senate seat and a big night for Republicans.

Polls close in Pennsylvania an hour after Georgia, and we’ll have early indicators of where the race stands between Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman, a Democrat, and famed GOP doctor Mehmet Oz. Fetterman had created a small respite in this race, but he closed the section.

Look at the early numbers for Erie County on the northwest tip of the state, Luzerne County on the northeast end, and Northampton on the east coast. Those are considered as the “hub” counties in the state and will give us an early indication if the Democrats have a chance of flipping a Republican seat.

While you’re there, don’t ignore New Hampshirewhere incumbent Democratic Senator Maggie Hassan had appeared to be a comfortable favorite over Donald Bolduc, but recent polls show close competition – competition that, if the Democrats end up losing, would make a Republican-controlled Senate all but inevitable .

We’ll have our first issues just after 8 p.m. MT.

Obviously the first race I’m going to watch is the game between Mike Lee and Evan McMullin. I suspect McMullin will have to be a few points ahead in the first ballot dump if there’s a chance. Also pay attention to the percentage of this first batch coming from Salt Lake County. If it is more than 35%, the county is overrepresented in these early numbers and later results will tend towards Lee.

Then I will look at the numbers in the Salt Lake County Council race between Republican Richard Snelgrove and State Rep. Suzanne Harrison. Harrison, a Democrat, will need to be solid in Sandy and Draper and not blow himself up on the southwest end of the valley. The same general rule applies to the other two high-profile county races – the district attorney race between Sim Gill and Danielle Ahn and the clerk contest between Lannie Chapman and Goud Maragani.

After that, my attention will turn to one of the most fascinating races: Republican candidate writes Steve Handy against republican Trevor Lee. Running a print campaign in Utah is a huge challenge, but Lee’s incendiary rhetoric has generated a lot of money for Handy’s cause. He drives around in a small Smart Car with a giant pen that says “Write In Steve Handy” on it and sent 10,000 full-size pens with the slogan on them to voters in the district.

Barring upheavals in New Hampshire, Arizona, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Ohio or whatever, I agree with the folks at FiveThirtyEight that the party that wins two of the three races in Georgia, Pennsylvania and Nevada will emerge with control of the Senate.

Nevada could therefore be the last shoe to fall. That race has been tight between former Attorney General Adam Paul Laxalt and incumbent Democratic Senator Catherine Cortez Masto, but Laxalt opened up a lead in the latest poll.

Keep an eye on Washoe County, or better yet, take to Twitter and follow Jon Ralston of The Nevada Independent for the best analysis around.

We won’t have any final results on Tuesday night and some of these races may be too close to report, so don’t get impatient.

That said, I’m interested to see how willing some candidates are to concede defeat — particularly if Maragani loses the race for Salt Lake County clerks — or if we receive preposterous allegations of fraud.

There are several Utah House races to watch. The top races for Democrats are Fatima Dirie’s challenge to Rep. Judy Weeks-Rohner in West Valley City; Lynette Wendell’s rematch against Rep. Jim Dunnigan, who won in Taylorsville by 84 votes last time out; and Alan Anderson’s bid against Rep. Steve Eliason, who won by 23 votes last time out at Sandy.

Republicans are aiming for Jill Koford to knock down Rep. Rosemary Lesser in Weber County and Quin Kotter to upset Rep. Elizabeth Weight in a revised Magna and West Valley district.

* * * * *

“You should write a column about me.”

My friend Matt Seare often told me that. Usually it was at the end of a few beers and a bunch of jokes that had everyone rolling, none of which can be printed in a family newspaper.

I pumped him for cooking tips, offered my couch when the Vikings lost, and swore I’d beat him at the cornhole next time. Maybe I could write about how he beat me again, he suggested, but that wasn’t really news.

Above all, whenever our messed up little family was together, he would tell each of us how much he loved us. And everyone’s day was a little better because of him.

“So when are you going to write about me?”

I guess it’s today, even if it wasn’t the way I wanted it to be. Last weekend, while Matt was watching a University of Minnesota Gophers football game, he wasn’t feeling well and decided he needed to go to the hospital. Turns out he suffered a massive stroke, much, much too young.

Naturally, Matt was an organ donor, so somewhere one lucky person got a used liver and someone else got an absolutely amazing heart.

This has not been easy.

It’s never easy to lose someone special, and Matt was special. He was special to his love, Leah, his precious daughter, Olivia, and our close-knit family. And he made sure, without a doubt, that we always knew we were special to him.

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5 Tips for Cooking Juicy Pork Chops Quickly https://cocinaconcarmen.com/5-tips-for-cooking-juicy-pork-chops-quickly/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 00:12:09 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/5-tips-for-cooking-juicy-pork-chops-quickly/ A good pork chop is a thing of beauty. When handled correctly – with a nicely caramelized crust enveloping moist, flavorful meat – it can even give your favorite cut of steak a hard time. But anyone who has eaten this cut of meat has often encountered at least one tough, dry cutlet, leading them […]]]>

A good pork chop is a thing of beauty. When handled correctly – with a nicely caramelized crust enveloping moist, flavorful meat – it can even give your favorite cut of steak a hard time. But anyone who has eaten this cut of meat has often encountered at least one tough, dry cutlet, leading them to try and choke it anyway to save face or avoid food waste.

The oven is one way to avoid the parched pork chops, but it may take longer than I’m willing to spend on a weeknight. When I’m hungry, cooking pork chops on the stovetop can put them on my plate in minutes, but without the right care, these warriors of the week can easily turn into shoe leather.

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Fuel Up: Food TV, Art, Books and More, Glorious Food | Culture https://cocinaconcarmen.com/fuel-up-food-tv-art-books-and-more-glorious-food-culture/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/fuel-up-food-tv-art-books-and-more-glorious-food-culture/ Music Between Bonita Applebum, Butter and the Jam, hip-hop titans A Tribe Called Quest don’t hesitate to pay a gastronomic tribute. On Ham’n’Eggs, floating like croutons on languorous beat soup, Q-Tip and Phife Dawg tie gourmet punchlines like cherry stalks, extolling the virtues of candied yams, slim jims and “nice red beets” as if to […]]]>

Music

Between Bonita Applebum, Butter and the Jam, hip-hop titans A Tribe Called Quest don’t hesitate to pay a gastronomic tribute. On Ham’n’Eggs, floating like croutons on languorous beat soup, Q-Tip and Phife Dawg tie gourmet punchlines like cherry stalks, extolling the virtues of candied yams, slim jims and “nice red beets” as if to concoct a great Sunday brunch in the great American South. They might warn of high cholesterol, but it has the opposite effect. if you’re not raiding the closets by his call-and-response closure, you’ve got much better self-control than we do. jenessa williams


Television

Umami dreamer… obsessed with ramen Ivan Orkin. Photography: Geoff Johnson/Netflix

From “crack pies” in New York to onion pakoda in Bangkok, Chef’s table is a journey through the cuisines, food traditions and obsessions of chefs from different continents. Each episode follows a new leader in detail; you can meet the “master of umami” Ivan Orkin, whose ramen you can taste through the screen, then dive into the crazy world of dough-obsessed “mozzarella maven” Nancy Silverton. It’s the personal stories that really make the series – scenes of innovative and mouth-watering food mixed with harrowing tales of psychological breakdown, destruction of property and loss of homes, but also inspiring social advocacy for undocumented migrants, women in the workplace and conservation efforts. Jason Okundaye


The cover of Babette's Feast by Isak Dinesen
Babette’s Feast by Isak Dinesen.

Book

After fleeing the repression of the Paris commune in 1871, Babette finds herself a servant in a small Norwegian town, Babette’s Feast, Karen Blixen’s novel written as Isak Dinesen, serving stark dishes of codfish and soup to the Puritan daughters of a local minister. But when she wins the French lottery, Babette uses the funds to demonstrate her true artistry. She prepares a feast for the repressed siblings and their friends, providing them with the finest food and wine known to mankind. But it’s not just Blixen’s descriptions of food and drink that make you hungry – it’s the pride Babette takes in creating them. Food for the heart as well as the stomach. Sam Jordan


Art

White ceramic bowl by Fede Galizia with red and blue peaches and plums.
White ceramic bowl by Fede Galizia with red and blue peaches and plums. Photography: Aliyah

You almost believe you could eat this fruit. Fede Galizia, a late Renaissance Milanese woman painter specializing in still life, gives peaches not just a deep sensual color, but a hairy texture that tickles the taste buds, a rounded mass that makes you feel their weight when you touch them. take one and take one bite… then try the plums. The ancient Greek artist Zeuxis is said to have tricked birds into trying to eat his painted fruit. Galizia rivals him. She shares this gift with her contemporary Caravaggio but her fruit is always on the verge of rotting, while hers is a virtual merry feast. jonathan jones


Film

Mouth-watering Stuff - Eat Drink Man Woman
Mouth-watering stuff… Eat Drink Man Woman. Photography: Ronald Grant

Buns are steamed, pork braised and a single expertly sliced ​​red pepper in the opening scene of Ang Lee’s comedy eat drink man woman. Its opening lines are, aptly, “Have you eaten yet?” followed by an argument over the best way to cook the fish. Zhu is a semi-retired chef and widower living with three adult daughters in Taipei; one is considering moving out and isn’t sure how his father will handle the news. Food is a source of love and intrigue within the family, often filling in the gaps of the unsaid. He is also a character in his own right in a film; there are plans to whet the appetite in a family kitchen, a hectic restaurant kitchen and a bustling banquet hall. Lee, who would continue to do Brokeback Mountain and Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, said he wanted to “make a movie that makes the audience’s saliva grow”. He certainly succeeds. Rebecca Liu

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Pumpkin Season: Squeeze More Of This Delicious Vegetable https://cocinaconcarmen.com/pumpkin-season-squeeze-more-of-this-delicious-vegetable/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 09:16:00 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/pumpkin-season-squeeze-more-of-this-delicious-vegetable/ October is Halloween month, and that means pumpkins are everywhere. It’s not just pumpkins on steps and windowsills: supermarket shelves and market stalls are also piled high with vibrant gourds of various shapes and shades. There are several hundred edible varieties of pumpkin, but in most Western supermarkets, butternut squash and Hokkaido pumpkin are the […]]]>

October is Halloween month, and that means pumpkins are everywhere.

It’s not just pumpkins on steps and windowsills: supermarket shelves and market stalls are also piled high with vibrant gourds of various shapes and shades.

There are several hundred edible varieties of pumpkin, but in most Western supermarkets, butternut squash and Hokkaido pumpkin are the most common. Pumpkin is an incredibly versatile vegetable and lends itself to many more dishes than just the regular, yet very delicious soup.

Here are some of our favorite recipes, along with tips on how best to make different varieties.

Are all parts edible?

Pumpkins can be divided into three different categories: Those used for their tasty pulp, such as Hokkaido, for example, those from which only the seeds are used to extract oil from dark green pumpkin seeds, and those used for decoration – in because of the bitter substances they contain. not suitable for the kitchen!

With edible pumpkins like Hokkaido, you can also use other components besides the pulp. Try filled flowers, for example, best picked from your pumpkin patch. “You can cover them with pancake batter and fry them in a little oil,” recommends pumpkin growing expert Daniela Gamb.

What else would you eat pumpkin soup from, if not another pumpkin? (Ap Photo)

Be sure to only harvest the male flowers without ovaries – recognizable by the long stem – as the females are meant to grow into pumpkins.

The skin is usually only edible on summer squash. “Summer pumpkins, especially zucchini, are harvested before they are ripe and still have a soft skin,” says Hans-Georg Levin of the Agricultural Information Center (BZL) Germany. It is therefore not necessary to peel the vast majority of summer squash.

Winter squash, on the other hand, is harvested later, when the pumpkin has reached maturity. At this point, the skin will have hardened into a hard crust that is no longer edible. That is, with the exception of the all-time favorite, Hokkaido: despite being a winter squash, its skin is still soft enough to eat.

Meanwhile, besides producing oil, roasted pumpkin seeds also make a great snack. Instead of buying them from the supermarket, try using up any leftovers after making your next batch of pumpkin soup. When roasting them in a pan, you can also add some spices.

How to properly cut a pumpkin

Many varieties, like Hokkaido, are quite stiff when raw, which makes chopping a bit difficult.

Ute Ligges, who runs a pumpkin farm in western Germany, has a piece of advice: “Put it in the oven and pre-bake it a bit, it makes it soft and easier to cut. Ten minutes at 180 degrees Celsius is often enough.

Next, place the pumpkin on a wooden board and cut it with a large, sharp knife.

What spices are the best for seasoning pumpkin?

The original taste of most pumpkins is rather subtle, so adding a healthy helping of condiments helps spice things up a bit – and don’t go too easy on your squash: pumpkins can take on stronger spices and hot stuff.

For a spicy dish, try adding ginger, chilli, curry powder, garlic, paprika, onion, nutmeg and balsamic vinegar, for example, or a combination of some of the above items.

If you’re making sweet pumpkin, and if you haven’t tried it yet, you should! – season with honey, cinnamon or fruit juice or add pineapple, apples or oranges for example.

The classic of classics: pumpkin soup

It’s a dish that never gets old. Easy to prepare, pumpkin soup is a hearty dish perfect for chilly fall days.

While many like to use Hokkaido, which has the advantage of not having to be peeled before cooking, Daniela Gamb prefers butternut squash which is a bit more delicate in texture. Hokkaido sometimes makes the soup a little floury, she says.

Whichever variety you prefer, here’s what you need for four servings — or 2 liters (half a gallon) of soup:

500 grams of pumpkin pulp, 1 onion, 4 tablespoons of butter, 3/4 l of vegetable stock, 1/8 l of cream, 100 grams of fresh cream, vinegar, salt, pepper, garlic powder, two slices of toasted bread.

Dice the pumpkin and sauté in butter with the sliced ​​onions until golden. Pour in the broth and cook for 15 minutes, then purée in a blender. Add the cream and crème fraîche and whisk the soup until frothy.


Probably the weirdest of all pumpkins, spaghetti squash can be its own bowl and works great right out of the oven with a little cheese and Bolognese.  (Ap Photo)
Probably the weirdest of all pumpkins, spaghetti squash can be its own bowl and works great right out of the oven with a little cheese and Bolognese. (Ap Photo)

Season to taste with a little vinegar and spices.

Cut the bread into cubes and toast in butter. Garnish with toasted bread cubes when serving.

If you want to experiment with the taste, try adding other ingredients, such as potatoes, carrots or an apple. Top your finished soup with pumpkin seed oil and freshly chopped chives.

Tastier Pumpkin Recipes

Pumpkin is a versatile dish that not only makes a great soup, but can also be added to casseroles, fried or barbecued, for example.

If you want to try fried pumpkin, butternut is the best, according to Gamb. “Cut it into thin slices and sauté it in the pan or on the grill.” Lamb’s lettuce is a great side dish, topped with nuts, goat cheese and a vinaigrette.

Ute Ligges has a simple recipe for baked pumpkin. You will need two pumpkins, for example, Puccini or Rolet, 2 tablespoons of butter, salt and herbs such as thyme.

Cut the pumpkins in half and scoop out the seeds with a spoon. Fill with butter and bake at 160 degrees Celsius (320 degrees Fahrenheit) for about 25 minutes. Season with salt and herbs before serving.

Another option is to cut the vegetables into quarters and bake them at 200 degrees Celsius (390 degrees Fahrenhiet) for about 20 minutes to make pumpkin fries. Season with salt and pepper after they are crispy.

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She cooks recipes she finds on tombstone epitaphs https://cocinaconcarmen.com/she-cooks-recipes-she-finds-on-tombstone-epitaphs/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 10:08:19 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/she-cooks-recipes-she-finds-on-tombstone-epitaphs/ Comment this story Comment The first time Rosie Grant baked a recipe she found carved on a stranger’s tombstone, she made a batch of spritz cookies. From his kitchen in Takoma Park, Maryland, Grant mixed the batter in a large bowl. There were no instructions to follow, only a list of simple ingredients: butter, sugar, […]]]>

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The first time Rosie Grant baked a recipe she found carved on a stranger’s tombstone, she made a batch of spritz cookies.

From his kitchen in Takoma Park, Maryland, Grant mixed the batter in a large bowl. There were no instructions to follow, only a list of simple ingredients: butter, sugar, vanilla, an egg, flour, baking powder and salt. The cookies were divine.

Since her first foray into baking this tombstone recipe a year ago, she’s made several other recipes she’s found in cemeteries across the country. The preparation of delicacies by the deceased became a hobby for Grant. It’s unusual, yes, but fulfilling.

“Cooking these recipes showed me another side of death,” said Grant, 33. “It’s a way to memorialize someone and celebrate their life.”

Before she came across her first recipe, she had never heard of grave cooking instructions. It’s not a trivial sentiment for a headstone, she says, but there are definitely a few there. And once she tasted it, she made it her mission to find more.

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When she baked the spritz cookies last October, Grant had recently completed an internship at Congress Cemetery in DC – as part of his courses for the master library and information science program at the University of Maryland, from which she graduated earlier this year.

In one of her classes, Grant was instructed to create a social media account. Her teacher suggested she use her new TikTok profile to document her internship at the cemetery. She liked the idea and decided to call her account “ghost archive”.

At the time, “I was very new to the world of cemeteries,” she said, adding that her first posts included detailing the five things she learned on the first day of her internshipand another showcasing the Congressional Cemetery LGBTQ section.

“It was the best internship,” Grant said. “I never thought I would enjoy it so much.”

After the internship ended, she continued to chronicle the contents of the cemetery on her TikTok account. She quickly realized that she was not the only one with a fascination for cemeteries.

“I discovered the TikTok graveyard, which is its own gigantic niche,” Grant said, explaining that she dug up countless graveyard-themed accounts. “They are named”taphophiles‘” — a person with a passion for cemeteries, funerals and headstones.

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As a new taphophile herself, Grant has spent much of her free time surfing the web for graveyard stories. Her research led her to an Atlas Obscura article on Naomi Odessa Miller-Dawson spritz cookie recipeengraved on his tombstone in Brooklyn, NY “The lighthearted epitaph on the tombstone is a nod to the simple joys in life,” the post read.

“What a cool gift she put on her tombstone,” Grant recalled. “I will try to do it.”

She recorded the cooking process and posted on TikTok“and it exploded,” she said.

She ended her TikTok with, “They are to die for.”

Grant began looking for other tombstone recipes and “I learned there were several more,” she said, adding that she had found a few in the United States and two in Israel. “In North America, all have been women, and all but one have been desserts.”

She’s spent the last year researching headstone recipes online and cook them all. The second she did was Martha Kathryn “Kay” Kirkham Andrews famous fudge – the recipe is engraved on a tombstone in Logan, Utah. Grant shared a video of herself fudge making process on TikTokand Andrews’ family found out.

“I think she would find it very comforting that her fudge recipe lives on,” said Natalie Andrews, the DC-based granddaughter of Kay Andrews. “My grandmother would have been delighted.”

Andrews described her grandmother – who died aged 97 – as ‘the happiest and most loving person’ and ‘a true grandmother’.

She always carried Tootsie Rolls in her purse as a gift, her granddaughter said, and she loved cooking and baking. She often delivered homemade treats to people’s homes.

“Fudge was his signature gift,” Andrews said. “She loved to give.”

“The food,” she continued, “is really how she showed her love.”

It was her grandmother’s idea to engrave the recipe on her own headstone, which she shares with her husband, Wade, who died in 2000. Kay Andrews – who died in 2019 – had the recipe engraved and installed after the death of her husband, giving her nearly two decades to watch strangers fall on her common stone and make her beloved caramel.

“She could see him becoming popular. She had a real kick,” Andrews said. The recipe for the tombstone “matched his sense of humor and his desire to give to others”.

She now ends her TikToks with, “Another recipe to die for.” She is always on the lookout for more epitaph dishes.

“There are more out there, and I’ll keep looking for them,” Grant said.

According to Loren Rhoads, lecturer on the history of cemeteries and author of “The Garden of Death Revisited” tombstone recipes are relatively rare.

“In all the cemeteries I’ve seen, I’ve never seen a headstone with a recipe on it,” Rhoads said, adding that she’s visited “hundreds of cemeteries.”

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It’s a lovely concept, especially since, “in Victorian times, sometimes women didn’t even have their own names on their headstones,” Rhoads said. “To see women claiming this now, or to see families claiming this for their matriarch, I think that’s really cool.”

Recipe epitaphs actually make a lot of sense, Rhoads said, given the connection between food and death. In times of sadness and grief, food serves as comfort and a source of longing.

In his experience making tombstone recipes, Grant noticed the same connection.

“There’s this connection with food and death,” Grant said, adding that she lost both of her grandmothers during the pandemic, and every time she eats a meal they once cooked for her. , “it brings me all the closer to them”.

“Food is this weird doorway to talk about harder topics like death. We don’t want to think about our own mortality, but talking about food and memorializing is a bit more acceptable,” said Grant, who works as a librarian and recently moved to Los Angeles, “I’m extremely uncomfortable with death. This whole process has been a way for me to approach these more difficult subjects.”

Grant has prepared recipes from tombstones in New York, Iowa, Alaska, Louisiana, California, Utah, Washington, and Israel. Beyond making the recipes, she also hopes to visit the graves of all the people whose final resting place is beneath their favorite ingredients. So far, she has reached three, including that of Kay Andrews in Utah.

“My goal is to go to all of them,” she said. “I would love to cook the recipe and taste it at their grave as an encouragement to that person who gave this gift to me and everyone else.”

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The Best No-Cook Backpacking Breakfasts https://cocinaconcarmen.com/the-best-no-cook-backpacking-breakfasts/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 21:15:51 +0000 https://cocinaconcarmen.com/the-best-no-cook-backpacking-breakfasts/ “], “filter”: { “nextExceptions”: “img, blockquote, div”, “nextContainsExceptions”: “img, blockquote”} }”> Get full access to Outside Learn, our online education hub featuring in-depth fitness, nutrition and adventure lessons and over 2,000 instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ >”,”name”:”in -content-cta”,”type”:”link”}}”>Join Outside+ today. I’ve long wondered why oatmeal is the default hiker’s breakfast, even though […]]]>

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Get full access to Outside Learn, our online education hub featuring in-depth fitness, nutrition and adventure lessons and over 2,000 instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ >”,”name”:”in -content-cta”,”type”:”link”}}”>Join Outside+ today.

I’ve long wondered why oatmeal is the default hiker’s breakfast, even though many of my friends seem to hate it. Of course, it’s nutritious, light and easy to prepare with a one-burner stove and a stream water Nalgene. But that doesn’t make up for the experience of smothering sporkful after sporkful of gooey, bland glop just to fill your belly. Breakfast should be enjoyable on and off the trail – it sets the tone and your energy level for the day, after all.

There are plenty of dehydrated eggs and scrambled sausages on the market, but I often find them just as unpalatable: inevitably, I end up with crispy egg chunks or cookie-and-gravy soup. Additionally, the price tags on those commercial meals are so mouth-watering they almost make me go for the oatmeal again.

More often than not, I find myself wanting to skip the morning cooking routine altogether. By packing up the stove and doing the dishes the night before, I can break camp faster, which means more time in my cozy sleeping bag or a boost in my daily mileage. No-cook breakfasts also offer flexibility. Are you not hungry for your start in the mountains or are you too cold to have a cold breakfast? Instead, choose to start the hike and eat at your first sunny vantage point.

Sounds good, you might say, but I’m turn on the stove for coffee anyway. You can always save time by boiling water the night before and keeping it overnight in a thermal mug. It will be piping hot for your instant java in the morning, and you can enjoy the first sip from the comfort of your tent.

Pop-tarts and bars are the go-to cold breakfast options for many backpackers, but these lack well-rounded nutrition and don’t offer much more flavor than oatmeal. Here are 10 energizing no-cook camp breakfast ideas that you can put together in minutes.

avocado toast

(Photo: Miguel Serrano Ruiz/iStock/Getty Images Plus)

Who said this must-have filler was just for candle cafes? Avocados are great food for backpackers: they’re easy to pack, don’t get crushed, and are ready to eat when you’re hungry. Spread some on a tortilla with salt, red pepper flakes or your favorite seasoning. Add a packet of olive oil for more calories.

Cereals and powdered milk

I don’t understand why this most common breakfast combo is less popular on the trail. The perfect alternative for those who hate oatmeal, a healthy cereal can offer similar nutritional value (plus added protein and calcium from milk), and is as simple as adding cold water. Pack your favorite cereal in the same bag or container as powdered milk, then simply add water and stir. Add dried fruit for a heartier meal.

Smoothies and meal replacement shakes

We’ve been a longtime fan of Backcountry Foodie’s Peanut butter and chocolate shake as a meal alternative at high altitude when appetite is scarce, and it’s also a great way to start the day. You can eat a liquid breakfast on the go, and powdered ingredients like peanut butter, protein powder, and shake mix take up little room in your bag. You can also dehydrate your favorite breakfast smoothie at home – just mix, spread on dehydrating trays, and dry the mixture at 125°F until brittle. The blend will immediately rehydrate for an instant, fresh-tasting breakfast.

Waffles and peanut butter

Prepackaged Belgian waffles are shelf stable, ready to eat, and more filling than their grilled counterparts, especially when paired with a protein-rich spread like nut butter (or Nutella, why not). Need more energy? Stroopwafels are a favorite among endurance athletes for a reason.

Yogurt parfaits

Outdoor takeaway breakfast in a insulated mug. Fresh bananas, yogurt and granola. (Photo: Nick Ocean Photography/Moment Open via Getty Images)

Dehydrated yogurt is widely available, or easy to do at home. (Adventurer? You can also ferment yourself on the wayl.) Add cold water and top with dried fruit, granola, chocolate chips or any toppings of your choice for a luxurious perfect. Don’t want to tinker? This bowl of yogurt from Stowaway Gourmet is the best freeze dried breakfast I have tasted.

Chia Pudding and Dried Fruits

Chia seeds are a good source of fibre, protein and healthy fats, making it a great way to start a day of hiking. Soak them in water, powdered milk, or nut milk as you walk the first mile of the day, and add mix-ins like dried mango, honey, nuts, maple, coconut or cocoa powder. Tip: Too much chia can cause stomach upset, so mix it with your favorite grain to aid digestion.

loaded bagel

If you don’t mind getting stuck in your bag, a bagel makes a convenient and tasty cold breakfast on the trail. Top it with cream cheese (buy shelf stable packets), bagged salmon, or any spread of your choice.

Oats “overnight”

I know I’ve denounced rolled oats before, but bear with me: overnight rolled oats are creamier and easier than their cooked counterparts, with a chewier texture that might convert even the most averse oats. Add a sweetener of your choice when you wake up, plus fruit, chocolate, nuts, or whatever you want, and you’ll have breakfast ready after camp break two hours later (or when you first hiking break). On colder nights, you can soak them overnight to prepare breakfast when you wake up. Still not a fan? Cold soak oatmeal, ramen noodles or dehydrated potatoes and top it with bacon bits for a tasty breakfast.

Breakfast charcuterie

(Photo: Westend61/Westend61 via Getty Images)

A granola bar on its own can make for a sad camp breakfast, but pair it with your favorite trail snacks and you have a hearty meal. We like homemade energy ballstrail mix, fruit and jerky to start the day.

Eggless breakfast burrito or tacos

You don’t need to fire up the stove to whip up a perfectly delicious breakfast burrito. A combination of cheese, salsa, avocado, pre-packaged beans and vegetables is equally good cold. Wrapped and seasoned jackfruit is a great no-cook vegetarian alternative to meat or eggs. Just lay it on a tortilla, add your favorite toppings, fold and hit the road.

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